Fs, Buts And Maybes

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Morocco (I think!), 2012

In the House of Commons, here in the UK, when the MPs have voted the result may well be that “the Ayes have it”. (‘Aye’ is pronounced ‘I’.) Well, unlike the House of Commons, in the house of Bossymamma it is the Fs that have it: Fibro Fog, Fibro Feet, Fumbling Fibro Fingers, Fatigue and Freezing [cold]. And I’m Fed up with it!

Let’s go through those and explain all the joys of the Fs.

Fibro Fog has been making itself felt over the past few weeks, in subtle ways rather than the full-blown muzzy headedness. I have found that simple things have been the ones that my brain hasn’t dealt with very well: for example, hearing “Monday”, repeating “Monday” but writing down “Wednesday”, or reading an instruction, apparently understanding that instruction, and then doing something completely different! One way in which the Fibro Fog has been particularly irritating is when I am knitting. Usually I can knit happily away making whatever takes my fancy. Hmph. Recently I have lost count of the number of times I have had to unpick my knitting because of silly mistakes that I would normally make only rarely. Very annoying.

Next we have the myriad delights of Fibro Feet. Oh, what would life be without Fibro Feet? For, literally, decades I have had hot feet. Admittedly, I don’t like having hot feet but that’s another matter. Now, however, I often have cold feet which, in itself, is not a problem: I simply put on a pair of socks. That’s fine until Fibro Feet decide to kick in [apologies for the unintended pun]. The internal temperature of my feet rockets, the knives start stabbing every part of my feet, the pain intensifies etc. etc. and I just don’t know what to do with my feet.

Now, Fumbling Fibro Fingers haven’t happened much up until now. The most notable occasion that they decided to play was when I was on at a hand sewing workshop – it was very inconvenient. So, Fumbling Fibro Fingers decided they were lonely and wanted to come for an extended visit. Gee, thanks, boys! Do you have any idea how frustrating it is when your fingers are following a different set of instructions from those your brain are giving them? Not only that, but they decide that not more than two fingers will work at any one time and when the next two join in, they will actually be following a third set of instructions that are in Japanese! I’ll just remind you of my love of knitting, here…

Fatigue. Need I say more?

Freezing? In September? In England? Surely not? Hmph. Surely, YES… I should say that this is possibly (or probably) nothing to do with fibromyalgia, but it’s happening now because I have been another sort of unwell and it’s adding to my fedupness.

I hope that my fedupness will soon be over and life will be more like my normal soon. I expect you are, too, so that my next post is not so grumpy.  Fumbling Fibro Fingers crossed!

 

 

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It’s VERY Expensive!

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Not very welcoming, is it?

FPR’s mother is still in hospital, with all that it entails. She rings me, asking if I will do something for her, then gives instructions in her own particular way. Often the tasks are clearly unnecessary and unlikely to yield any positive result, which makes it difficult to be enthusiastic in the carrying out of them. The trouble is that these tasks take a heavy toll. They drain what little energy I have – and, believe me, it is very little.

You know what it’s like when someone is in hospital: there are telephone calls, more telephone calls and even more telephone calls; chasing round trying to find things the patient has asked for; walking and caring for the patient’s dog; miles and miles of extra driving, much of it on unfamiliar routes; meals at peculiar times because of visiting hours and travelling time to and from the hospital; trying to fit in ordinary day-to-day appointments, and so on. Then there’s the cost…

The cost I am talking about isn’t financial, it’s physical. I am feeling constantly drained and, because I am so exhausted, that is interfering with my sleep pattern. For the past couple of weeks I have been lucky to manage four or five hours at night, and, on several occasions, it has been much less than that. It is taking a heavy toll. The more tired I become, the more problems I encounter with my sleeping, the more pain I have, the foggier my brain is and the more unwell I feel.

As I said, it’s very expensive.

The Pleasure And The Pain

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Sunset at Stepping Hill Hospital, 29 August 2017

Regular readers of this blog will know that I am very fortunate as pain is not a large part of my fibromyalgia. I hope new readers will accept that fibro isn’t always all about pain.

FPR’s mother has recently been sampling the delights of the NHS, as delivered by Stepping Hill Hospital, which is to the south of Stockport in Cheshire. We live on the northern fringes of Greater Manchester which means there are quite a few miles, and an awful lot of traffic between there and here! Even though I love driving my car and find it less tiring to drive than my previous one, sitting in traffic is no joy.

On Tuesday of this week, FPR and I set off with Lettie, m-i-l’s best-ever black labrador, on a hospital visit. Having made an early start, we had decided, for various reasons, that we would return home before the rush hour. There were a couple of tasks that I was hoping to complete for m-i-l that day which was why we set off when we did. Yes, well, the best laid plans and all that. I think it fair to say that our day did not go as planned – it felt rather like swimming in custard with an anchor tied to the ankles.

Due to a particular problem that cropped up, and a poor decision made by me, we ended up getting home much later than anticipated – but at least I had the pleasure of having completed everything I had hoped to! Oh my goodness, though, have I suffered for it!

On Wednesday, I had a quiet day. I knew I needed to be careful having had such a full-on day on Tuesday and I was feeling a bit tired. No, that’s not quite it. I felt a bit ‘squashy’. By that I mean that my brain was foggy, and my body felt like the physical equivalent of that, resulting in an overall feeling of squashy-ness. I gently plodded through the day, doing a bit of knitting, a bit of reading, spending a bit of time on my iPad – nothing too strenuous – and feeling very pleased with myself. Oops, that last bit was a mistake.

On Thursday I felt diabolical. I was so fatigued, I couldn’t even reach the dizzy heights of squashy-ness. I took things very easy. I did less knitting, no reading and less time on my iPad, but, even so, I felt worse as the day wore on. By the time 4.00pm came I knew I needed to go to bed. I usually avoid sleeping in bed during the day as I tend to recover my energy better after resting (with or without sleeping) in my recliner chair. However, sometimes that just isn’t enough, and that’s what was happening on Thursday: I wasn’t only feeling completely exhausted, I was feeling decidedly ill and nauseous – and it was getting worse with every step I took. Going up the stairs was quite interesting as I had to stop after every couple of steps.

I fell asleep almost as soon as my head hit the pillow. Zonk!

I awoke at around 6.00pm for three or four minutes and then zonked out again until about 7.00pm. I felt very much better than I had before I went to bed, but I still didn’t feel great. However, I did improve as the evening wore on until, by the time I was thinking of going to bed, I was wide awake and raring to go. I stayed up a bit longer, doing things that should prepare one for sleep, then retired to bed. I lay in bed, wide awake, for a couple of hours then gave up trying to sleep and got up again. I eventually fell asleep in my chair for an hour and a half or so and that was it until Friday night. Consequently, I wasn’t full of beans on Friday either. Unbelievably, the fatigue and exhaustion were still hanging over me yesterday!

I had the pleasure of doing everything I had planned to on Tuesday, but, my goodness, I have paid for it with the psychological pain of fatigue and exhaustion that I have suffered since.