Ghouls, Ghosties and Other Scary Things

27036663699_b6e85d062a_z

Morocco, 2012

Do you believe in ghosts? I don’t know whether I do, or not. I’ve never seen a ghost but that doesn’t mean they don’t exist, it simply means that none have appeared to me. I do believe that some people have abilities that we don’t exactly understand, although there are lots of charlatans who take advantage of people.

???

I can hear all the question marks knocking about in your head as you read this, wondering what on earth I am rabbiting on about. Allow me to enlighten you.

I have noticed what I think is a slightly weird phenomena. (OK, OK, FPR, I know that’s wrong, I typed it deliberately just to wind you up!) No, what I noticed was a weird phenomenon.

I seem to have developed an internal Early Warning System which lets me know when Fatigue is rushing in my direction. When I have been doing something for a while – it could be for any length of time from five minutes upwards – a knowledge comes upon me that I should stop. I don’t feel tired or fatigued. In fact, I often feel that I want to continue what I am doing. However, there is a voice in my head that tells me I should stop. I then find that within, literally, a minute or two, Fatigue has arrived for a visit. It really is most peculiar as the knowing can come at any time – it doesn’t appear after a certain period of time. As I said above, it can be five minutes after I start, or it could be 45 minutes but, regardless of how long it takes to happen, the Fatigue follows hot on its heels.

You may think that it is a self-fulfilling prophecy: that I think I might get tired and so I do get tired. However, it doesn’t seem to be. It matters not whether I continue what I am doing or take a break, Madame La Fatigué arrives with her suitcase looking set to outstay her welcome – just like the archetypal mother-in-law.

Generally, when this spooky starts, I will stop what I am doing. I have found that when Madame L F arrives in this manner, she packs a real punch. She sure does like to make her presence felt! These are the times when my every muscle screams to be allowed to fall in a heap wherever I am standing. The times when I don’t have the energy to knit, or surf the net; when I’m too exhausted to cope with even the most mindless programme on television; the times when I simply sit and do nothing. The strange thing is that this utter exhaustion isn’t any indication of how long I will feel unwell: I may feel much brighter after 10 or 15 minutes, or I might feel lousy for three or four hours. There is just no knowing.

 

Advertisements

Things That Go Bump In The Night

Barney

My lovely boy.

During the long, dark nights of Winter, many people like to share scary stories and so, on this dark winter’s morning I thought I would continue that tradition, albeit my timing is somewhat out. It’s a bit of an odd thing for me to do as I don’t enjoy being frightened. I have only ever watched one horror film: it was more than 45 years ago and it still gives me the creeps when it comes into my mind!

The start of my scary story is something of a cliché…

It was a cold, dark winter’s night and a gale was howling. There was no moon. Everywhere was black as coal: too dark to see anything. A bat skimmed by, leaving a whisper of its flight. A single, almost silent tap was heard, like a fingernail lightly touching glass. Suddenly that tiny sound exploded into a cacophonous clatter. The noise was deafening. It completely engulfed the cry of the rushing wind. Nothing existed but the sound which completedly overwhelmed the senses. There was an absolute knowledge of a cataclysmic happening. Life-changing. Earth shattering. Everything was obliterated by the intensity of the crushing and crashing. (*pauses dramatically)

It was the sound of Fibro Fog indelicately shoving all of Bossymamma’s marbles towards the brain’s Emergency Exit!

Ladies and gentlemen, Bossymamma’s marbles have left the building.

Fibro Fog rules in Bossymamma’s world.

You don’t think that’s very scary? Hmm. Try it. Try reading something, acting on it, making a telephone call about it and, during the call, realising that what you read was not what was written down. Try writing down some important information, only to find that you have changed just about every pertinent detail. Try having an apparently serious conversation with someone you have never met before and, halfway through a sentence, your brain turns to mush and, not only have you forgotten what you were going to say, but the entire discussion no longer makes any sense to you. Or, how about sorting your medication into dosette boxes, only to discover that you have made a confusing hash of it and have no idea what you’ve done or how to correct it? Believe me, it really does feel as though my marbles are AWOL.

But,

It’s not always like that. Sometimes my mind is as clear, as organised and as logical as it ever has been. Sometimes I can function like Me, Well, I suppose that should read “like the Me that I used to be”. However, I don’t want it to be the Me that I was, I want it to be the Me that I still am. It feels as though I am disappearing: being swallowed by Fibromyalgia and irrevocably changed by it. I’m not ready for me to vanish. Bits of me have been disappearing for years. Stress, anxiety and depression have taken their toll, eroding me. I used to be someone who coped, organised, did things, got others to do things, but that has been slipping away, to be replaced by a very different person – possibly one who is easier for others to be near, but not easier to actually be. Mind you, I haven’t completely given up.

Yesterday an article showed up in my Facebook Newsfeed. It discussed reasons why people with Fibromyalgia don’t like talking on the telephone. One sentence, in particular, stood out for me:

‘Personally, I really dislike speaking to strangers on the phone because I don’t want to appear stupid. At least if it’s someone I know well, I can say, “Sorry, I just had a fibro moment. Can you repeat that?” ‘

I have made a few telephone calls over the past couple of days during which Fibro Fog has made itself felt. However, unlike the author of that article, I am unconcerned about the possibility of appearing stupid. You see, I know that I’m not stupid and that is more important to me than the opnion of someone on the other end of a telephone. The way that I deal with Fibro Fog interfering in a conversation, either in person or on the telephone, is to tell the other person that I have a medical condition that sometimes turns my brain to mush and asking them to repeat what they have said, or explain it another way so that I can take it in. What I am telling them, in effect, is that I expect them to take some responsibility for ensuring that they are helping me to understand. I don’t think that’s unreasonable. How often have you heard someone say about computing, for example, that they ask their son/daughter/grandchild to show them? Then they go on to say that said son/daughter/grandchild just touches a few buttons and does it without explaining, so they don’t learn. It’s the same thing, isn’t it? What’s the point of me asking and then pretending that I have understood, when I haven’t? I’m not ready to sit quietly in the corner like a good little disabled person.

 

 

 

And Here’s Another Thing

IMG_6355

North Cape, June 2012

Yesterday I clicked on a link about Fibromyalgia that I saw on Facebook. A friend, who has had Fibro far longer than I, had shared this LINK to another Fibro-related blog. I rarely look at things about Fibro online, or elsewhere, unless there is something specific I want to research. However, something drew me to find out more.

When I clicked through to the blog and read the post, a light bulb went on inside my head! I could identify with what was being said. I don’t think I had ever really registered when something like this happens inside my head, but now someone else was talking about it… and it all made sense. Admittedly, and very fortunately, I don’t experience anything as bad as The Girl With Five Lads, but I certainly go through some of it. There are definitely times when it feels as though there is too much happening. Too much information. Too many directions I’m being pulled in. Too much to cope with.

“We all have times like those” you might say. “My life is really stressful.” “I’m always multi-tasking.” But, it’s not the same. It’s not trying to do cook the dinner, make a phone call, empty the bin and go to the loo, all at the same time. It’s trying to make sense of something that should be really straightforward, something which always has been simple before, but being unable to because you are being bombarded by huge amounts of information in different formats, at different volumes and speeds, in several different languages, all at the same time. The brain just wants to explode and then hide itself in a corner, so it decides to send you into a massive panic and tries desperately hard to make you crumple into tears. If you’re really lucky you’ll eventually be able to work out how to say “Stop”. And, if you’re luckier still, someone will be around who can help you to escape the attack of information, and give you a breathing space, a chance to calm down and recover.

Do you know the worst part about it? It’s feeling so pathetic because you “ought” to be able to filter all those ordinary things that have been attacking your senses and understand what’s going on – but you just can’t.