That’s Just The Way It Is

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Around St. Mary’s Cathedral, Sydney, July/August 2013

(Do you know, it takes me longer to find and decide upon the photograph for each post than to write the post?)

The weather has been very hot for the past couple of weeks and I am very fed up with it. Mind you, the people who are or have been closest to me would be amazed at how well I have coped with it. Believe me, hot weather and Bossymamma is not a good combination! I have always told people that my sons knew not to annoy me on a hot day because I was likely to explode at them. In fact, my Big Boy alluded to that, in a lighthearted way, when he and his family visited at the weekend. As for my Little Boy, he is probably dreading my impending visit!

I don’t know whether it is my advancing years, the Fibromyalgia, or a mixture of the two, but I seem to be coping with the heat far better than previously. I can’t begin to explain adequately how awful the heat usually makes me feel: it sucks every vestige of energy from me and makes me feel lousy. Actually, I don’t want to explain it, because of how dreadfully it affects me, so that is all I shall say about that.

To get back to the present, the heat seems to have triggered a major flare-up of the Fibro-related foot pain. It is particularly bad in my heels and often makes walking more difficult and more painful. The situation is made worse by the swelling in my feet, which I suffer in hot weather. I do take medication to reduce the swelling and I sit with my feet raised, whenever I can, but none of that helps enough. In fact, the pain has begun to manifest in my legs, in the three or four inches above my ankles. ‘Snot fair! Don’t like sore feet! Actually, the pain has been so intense, at times, that it has made me yelp. It used to be that the foot pain was at its worst soon after I retired to bed, but that is no longer the case. I think it is equally bad in or out of bed, at the moment. Sometimes it seems to be worse when I am in bed, but I don’t know if that is because there is less to distract me from it when I’m lying there. Whichever way you look at it, the foot pain is being very unpleasant at the moment.

Fatigue has also been problematic over the past couple of weeks. Obviously, it is impossible to know how much is attributable to the heat but, regardless of the cause, it has been challenging. Generally, when the fatigue is playing up, I can gauge when I have enough energy to deal with a task. However, that hasn’t been the case during this heatwave. When I have rested, I get up and start on the task I have set myself, only to find that my body can scarcely manage to move. There have been numerous times, recently, when my energy has simply evaporated. At those times, the lack of energy, the exhaustion, the fatigue, or whatever you want to call it, has been painful. I don’t mean that it causes pain but, rather, that it is the fatigue itself is painful. It has been difficult to cope with. I am used to my energy disappearing – I would say “disappearing in a puff of smoke” but there generally isn’t enough oomphf for it to manage doing that! – but the last couple of weeks have been a whole new ballgame. And, rather like the Football World Cup, I wish it wasn’t happening!

Amongst all this doom and gloom there is a metaphorical ray of sunshine: I have been granted a Blue Disabled Parking Badge! I can’t tell you how relieved I am. The whole application process caused me much anxiety. I knew that the state I am in should mean I am entitled to a Badge, but the process has been a challenge. I was so fearful of my application being rejected. My ability to go out and about has been severely limited because of the fatigue and the problems I have with walking, but I worried a lot about how well I would be able to put that across when making the application. It shouldn’t be like that and it makes me quite angry that disabled are put in that position.

When I was working, my job entailed completing all sorts of application forms for clients (I refuse to call people ‘service users’!). I had a very good success rate for Disability Living Allowance and Attendance Allowance claims as I knew how to put across the difficulties people had in a way that showed their entitlement. However, it’s a completely different matter when applying for something on one’s own behalf, as opposed to someone else’s. I suppose it’s because it is oneself who is affected by the results. When completing a form for someone else, it is very much easier to be objective than when applying for yourself. Even so, I think the ‘system’ makes things unnecessarily difficult for disabled people. During everyday life, people (whether able-bodied or disabled) look at ways that they can manage to do a particular thing but, when faced with something that requires proof of ability, or lack thereof, they have to ‘un’ think their solutions and focus on their difficulties. That is not easy. It may have taken years, with several increasingly complex ways of adapting their method to enable them to carry out that particular task. Not only is it difficult to think back and remember the difficulties you’ve had doing something, it’s also very depressing. You’re faced with the knowledge that there are lots of things you can’t do in the ‘normal’ way. Applying for any additional help is a gruelling task and one that it is not undertaken lightly.

Having clawed my way up onto my soapbox, I will now crawl down the least precarious route to tell you of one other thing that has happened since my last post.

Whilst sitting in the waiting room at the Amazing Dr. A’s surgery, prior to my appointment with him, I noticed a leaflet about something called the Staying Well Team. Upon reading said leaflet, I discovered that the team is there to help people with things to make their day-to-day lives easier or simpler. As my day-to-day life has changed so much recently, I decided I would give them a call. A lovely lady called Dawn explained that their main target age-group is the over 65s. However, in view of my difficulties, she said she would visit me to see if they could do anything to help. The visit went very well and she made several suggestions, most of which I thought were excellent. She is going to return with an Occupational Therapist with a view to my having a grab handle to help me cope with the step up to our side door, an extra bannister on the stairs and a folding seat in the shower. All of those will be wonderful as I am struggling in those three areas. She also offered me a toilet frame. hm. Not impressed. Really don’t want a toilet frame. Don’t like toilet frames. They make me think of people who are frail and about to ‘pop off’. They really are for Disabled People. And, yeuch, all those millions of corners which would fill up with nasty germy things – revolting! I am not at all houseproud, but toilet frames seem like really dirty, disgusting things. (Oh, crikey. What will I do if I reach the stage where I have to have one?) I was gratified that FPR was happy to have the equipment installed, as this house belongs to solely to him. I was also pleasantly surprised to hear that the equipment will not cost us anything.

Dawn also had questions and suggestions about social activities and said she will send me some information with my Well Being Plan. I emailed her after our meeting to ask about nail clipping services (as I don’t really want to pay £28.00 a time to a podiatrist to cut my nails!) and she has said she will include that information, too. Apparently the aim of the team is to delay the need for social care intervention. Whether that will be result  case remains to be seen but, so far, what the team provides is looking good. Watch this space!

 

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It Was A Cold, Dark Midwinter Night…

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A cold, dark midwinter night

Actually, no, it wasn’t, it was a warm, clammy, near midsummer night, but you get what I mean.

As I type this, it is Sunday morning and the clock reads 02:13. I have just sat down with a cup of coffee and a chocolate caramel biscuit. I got up 10 minutes ago, having retired at 9.00 o’clock last night because I was so tired it was almost literally painful. Just a few hours earlier, FPR had commented on the fact that I had been more awake than on the previous two days. S*d’s Law has had a very busy week, this week.

I had my assessment for a Blue Disabled Parking Badge on Wednesday of this past week. I had been anxious leading up to the day of the assessment but adrenaline saw me through – probably too well. The Occupational Therapist I saw informed me that it will take about 14 days for the matrix to calculate whether or not I am entitled to a Badge.

I was a bit tired for the rest of the day, but not overly so: I suspect the adrenaline was still working its magic. However, Thursday and Friday were completely written off. In fact, on Thursday, I could barely keep my eyes open. I was so fatigued it was making me nauseous. I managed to crawl into bed at 8.30pm – and I mean ‘crawl’. The thought of having to climb the stairs almost had me in tears. Somehow I made it into bed whereupon I slept. In fact, apart from a ‘comfort’ visit, I didn’t wake until late.

Friday wasn’t quite as bad, but I wasn’t able to do much. I did manage to do a little food shopping and a few rows of knitting, but that was about it. Oh, and I stayed up late. When I say ‘late’, I mean later than the previous night!

On Saturday, I had an appointment with the chiropodist. I have reached the point where I am too stiff to be able to cut my toenails. I don’t want to ask FPR to do them for various reasons, not the least of which is his eyesight. I don’t want to say he is myopic because of the connotations of that word, but he does have very short sight. Anyway, I digress. I attended the appointment and returned home. I spent the day awake but doing little, apart from arranging my forthcoming journey to see my baby son and his partner. I didn’t feel particularly fatigued, but neither did I feel like doing much. After dinner, I knitted just three rows of a very small item that I have on my needles before becoming exhausted. I sat quietly, becoming more tired and feeling more unwell until I managed to make the decision to go to bed. [NB I have worded that sentence like that deliberately as it’s how it happened. It took an inordinate amount of mental energy to actually realise and then decide that I had to go to bed.]

S*d’s Law was also at work earlier in the week. Last Sunday evening I had planned to meet a friend at a film screening in Longsight and to give another friend a lift home afterwards. I had dovetailed my entire weekend to give me the best possible chance of not having to cancel and everything was going well… Then our next-door neighbours’ daughter decided to play with her karaoke machine: outside, about 15 feet from our living room window, from around 3.00pm to 7.00pm – when I needed to sleep! I could have cried. I hadn’t expected that I would need to sleep, although, when I realised that I did need to, I didn’t perceive it as a particular problem as I had plenty of time. However, given that the ‘performance’ had started and then continued until 7.00pm, it completely scuppered any chance I had of going out, as I needed to leave soon after 6.00. I was sorely disappointed, especially as it meant letting down two friends. I am so very lucky to have understanding friends but it doesn’t stop me feeling embarrassed and ashamed at having to let them down.

S*d’s Law and Fibromyalgia (and, of course ME/CFS, if I do have it) have a lot to answer for!

 

Back To Square One

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Faroe Islands, August 2016

It feels as though I have gone back in time – well, sort of.

Let me to take you back to 2014, before Fibromyalgia had appeared on my horizon. My mother had finally moved into the retirement complex that was her idea of Utopia. Leading up to the move, on the Monday evening she had graciously (hmm, my tongue was firmly in cheek for that particular statement!) granted me special dispensation to begin packing her clothing, shoes and possessions. This was a huge concession on her part as it meant she was going to have to live surrounded by boxes for, oh, three days. Sorry, do I sound bitter?

Come moving day, I organised the removal men whilst trying to finish the packing, clean the flat, deal with all those last minute things that crop up and answer the phone to her, seemingly every 10 minutes. And, it was a stinking hot day. I do not and have never coped well with hot weather. The following fortnight continued to be excessively hot, with wall-to-wall sunshine. I was getting up at 5 o’clock every morning so that I could try to clean the flat properly before the day became even hotter. During the day I would have to take my mother out so that she could buy lots of new stuff for her new home, then, come the evening, I would do more cleaning and unpacking. After two weeks of cleaning, unpacking, sorting and so on, I finished. Phew.

I went home and, within a couple of weeks, was hit by a chest infection. After several weeks of the myriad joys of a chest infection, and almost as many courses of antibiotics, I was still suffering chest pain. I also had pain in the thoracic region of my back, which I had not previously experienced with a chest infection. Not only that, but I was totally exhausted: I was sleeping for hours during the day, as well as through the night. After a month or so, the Amazing Dr. A diagnosed Fibromyalgia.

I spent most of September, October and November asleep. Not dozing in a chair, but asleep lying on the sofa. (I don’t like going to bed during the day unless I really have to.) And, now, I feel as though I am in a time warp as I seem to be sleeping an awful lot of the time. Groooaaaaannnnn. Actually, I probably haven’t been sleeping quite so much as in 2014, but the amount of sleep does seem to be increasing this week. I have been able to do less and less during the past few days.

Not very long ago, I was able to do quite a bit. Even on a bad day I would be knitting, sewing or on the internet during the time that my body needed to rest. Now, however, things have changed. I still knit, but can only do a few rows in any session. I can do a bit of hand sewing, but only for 20 or 30 minutes. But… I now spend quite a while doing nothing (apart, perhaps, from watching trashy television). It’s a sobering reality, how little I can do. I still hope that this level of fatigue is temporary, that this Fibro flare will calm down, but it’s becoming more difficult to believe it.

I am at a stage in life when I should be enjoying myself. I have few responsibilities or obligations and I don’t have to work. I should be seeing, doing and learning new and exciting things, going out with family and friends, living the life I dreamed of. I shouldn’t be falling asleep at the drop of a hat and struggling to make sense of simple things. ‘Snot fair! I don’t like it!

 

I’ve Had A Little Chat…

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The Library in Tromsø, Norway

This week I had a chat with the wonderful Dr A. I told him about the new symptoms that I am having and said that I was wondering I may have Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) as well as Fibromyalgia. He agreed that, in the light of the recurrent sore throat and swollen glands, it is likely that I have both conditions as they are often found in the same patient. We discussed the possibility of my taking medication but, as Pregabalin and Gabapentin are both primarily prescribed for pain, I said I would still rather hold them in reserve, for the time being. I know that I can change my mind at any time, which is reassuring. At the moment, I can cope with the pain and discomfort that I am having so it makes sense to hold those two big boys in reserve for when the pain starts firing on all cylinders.

I’m not sure how I feel about the dual diagnosis. On the one hand, I am disappointed to have CFS but, on the other hand, it isn’t a surprise, particularly in view of how troublesome the fatigue is being. Even with all the recent developments in my condition(s), I am still very fortunate. As I said above, I am coping with the pain whereas so many Fibro warriors are often floored by it. As usual, it’s the fatigue that pulls the rug out from under me. This week has been difficult as it seems that anything and everything that I do brings on the fatigue. It’s not just that I am weary and exhausted but that I feel so unwell with it. ‘Snot fair!

 

Hello? I’m Afraid I Can’t…

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Photograph taken by me. Location unknown.

Those closest to me will be familiar with the phrase that I have used for the title of this post. Unfortunately I am having to say it to more people and on more occasions that I would like. And I don’t like it! Not one bit!

I very well know that I am not the most reliable of people, I am certainly notorious for not being on time – some may even say ‘late’! However, as my journey along the route known as Fibromyalgia continues and becomes more challenging, it becomes ever more difficult to stick to arrangements that have been made. Frustratingly, cancellation is an ever more frequent event. Just last night, FPR and I were in our coats, ready to leave his mother’s house, when I had to take off mine off, lie down on the sofa and try to sleep. That most unwelcome guest, Monsieur F.A. Tigué, suddenly popped up out of nowhere. So inconsiderate! Wouldn’t you think that, seeing FPR and me with our shoes and coats on and hearing us making our farewells, that Monsieur F.A. Tigué would keep his nose out and let us get on with it? Oh, no! Hmph! In he runs, bold as brass, wielding his slow-motion. Double hmph!

As if that wasn’t sufficiently annoying, this very afternoon, that irritating old codger decided to call in at our home. Grrr. I went upstairs to get ready. (I had arranged to go to meet a new friend before leaving to meet another friend for a film showing.) I didn’t notice anything in particular as I mounted the stairs but it was hiding behind the bathroom door and jumped on me as I entered. Grrr, hmph and stink bombs. Actually, it wasn’t Monsieur F.A. Tigué but his younger brother, Exhaustion-Related Back Pain. They are not a nice family, you know. If I were you, I would steer well clear of them. Each of them has a particularly nasty mean streak.

One of the Fibro symptoms that I get is back pain in the thoracic area of my spine. Sometimes it occurs at the same time as mirror-image chest pain. At other times, the onset of the back pain is a warning that exhaustion is about to knock me for six. There is a different feel to these two types of back pain, so I can normally recognise which is coming to visit. When it’s the Exhaustion-Related Back Pain I know that within a very few minutes I will be laid low by both back pain and exhaustion. Exhaustion rather than fatigue. And so it was, this afternoon.

It was so disappointing. Apart from being disappointed for myself, it meant I had to let down the two friends plus the person who was arranging the showing of the film. It’s at times like these that I get really fed up with the Fibro. I don’t want to disappoint people. It makes me feel pathetic that I am laid low in this way, but I know that it would be dangerous for me to attempt to drive when I am exhausted or fatigued. One positive thing that does come from times like these is that I am reminded of how very lucky I am in that I have friends who care and understand when I have to cancel: friends who know that any time we make arrangements, there is a considerable risk of me having to cancel, but they are still prepared to take the chance on me.

So, to all of my family and friends I would like to say thank you for still wanting to inlude me in excusions and arrangements and for not giving me a hard time when I have to cancel. I really do appreciate it. Please, let’s keep trying because it’s good fun when I don’t have to cancel.

Things That Go Bump In The Night

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My lovely boy.

During the long, dark nights of Winter, many people like to share scary stories and so, on this dark winter’s morning I thought I would continue that tradition, albeit my timing is somewhat out. It’s a bit of an odd thing for me to do as I don’t enjoy being frightened. I have only ever watched one horror film: it was more than 45 years ago and it still gives me the creeps when it comes into my mind!

The start of my scary story is something of a cliché…

It was a cold, dark winter’s night and a gale was howling. There was no moon. Everywhere was black as coal: too dark to see anything. A bat skimmed by, leaving a whisper of its flight. A single, almost silent tap was heard, like a fingernail lightly touching glass. Suddenly that tiny sound exploded into a cacophonous clatter. The noise was deafening. It completely engulfed the cry of the rushing wind. Nothing existed but the sound which completedly overwhelmed the senses. There was an absolute knowledge of a cataclysmic happening. Life-changing. Earth shattering. Everything was obliterated by the intensity of the crushing and crashing. (*pauses dramatically)

It was the sound of Fibro Fog indelicately shoving all of Bossymamma’s marbles towards the brain’s Emergency Exit!

Ladies and gentlemen, Bossymamma’s marbles have left the building.

Fibro Fog rules in Bossymamma’s world.

You don’t think that’s very scary? Hmm. Try it. Try reading something, acting on it, making a telephone call about it and, during the call, realising that what you read was not what was written down. Try writing down some important information, only to find that you have changed just about every pertinent detail. Try having an apparently serious conversation with someone you have never met before and, halfway through a sentence, your brain turns to mush and, not only have you forgotten what you were going to say, but the entire discussion no longer makes any sense to you. Or, how about sorting your medication into dosette boxes, only to discover that you have made a confusing hash of it and have no idea what you’ve done or how to correct it? Believe me, it really does feel as though my marbles are AWOL.

But,

It’s not always like that. Sometimes my mind is as clear, as organised and as logical as it ever has been. Sometimes I can function like Me, Well, I suppose that should read “like the Me that I used to be”. However, I don’t want it to be the Me that I was, I want it to be the Me that I still am. It feels as though I am disappearing: being swallowed by Fibromyalgia and irrevocably changed by it. I’m not ready for me to vanish. Bits of me have been disappearing for years. Stress, anxiety and depression have taken their toll, eroding me. I used to be someone who coped, organised, did things, got others to do things, but that has been slipping away, to be replaced by a very different person – possibly one who is easier for others to be near, but not easier to actually be. Mind you, I haven’t completely given up.

Yesterday an article showed up in my Facebook Newsfeed. It discussed reasons why people with Fibromyalgia don’t like talking on the telephone. One sentence, in particular, stood out for me:

‘Personally, I really dislike speaking to strangers on the phone because I don’t want to appear stupid. At least if it’s someone I know well, I can say, “Sorry, I just had a fibro moment. Can you repeat that?” ‘

I have made a few telephone calls over the past couple of days during which Fibro Fog has made itself felt. However, unlike the author of that article, I am unconcerned about the possibility of appearing stupid. You see, I know that I’m not stupid and that is more important to me than the opnion of someone on the other end of a telephone. The way that I deal with Fibro Fog interfering in a conversation, either in person or on the telephone, is to tell the other person that I have a medical condition that sometimes turns my brain to mush and asking them to repeat what they have said, or explain it another way so that I can take it in. What I am telling them, in effect, is that I expect them to take some responsibility for ensuring that they are helping me to understand. I don’t think that’s unreasonable. How often have you heard someone say about computing, for example, that they ask their son/daughter/grandchild to show them? Then they go on to say that said son/daughter/grandchild just touches a few buttons and does it without explaining, so they don’t learn. It’s the same thing, isn’t it? What’s the point of me asking and then pretending that I have understood, when I haven’t? I’m not ready to sit quietly in the corner like a good little disabled person.

 

 

 

I Must Go Shopping!

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Lettie is feeling a little chilly

Hello there. This will have to be a quick post as I am in a hurry to go shopping. I think John Lewis would be a good place to go but I may need to call in at a supermarket, too.

What do I need to buy so urgently, you ask. Well, our cutlery is looking a little the worse for wear so it would be as well to refresh that drawer. I think I shall buy a set with more place settings as we seem to use them all in no time at all. The situation is particularly bad with the spoons. It seems as though even first thing in the morning there are few usable spoons around. Not only that, but everything seems to need more spoons than usual. Just sitting in the chair, thinking about standing up, often feels as though it is using several of that day’s spoons. I think this is probably the worst patch of fatigue I have had since I was first diagnosed with Fibromyalgia. It would be easy to think “it’s not fair” but it doesn’t help. If anything, it makes things slightly worse. Mentally, I cope better if I keep away from the “Why me?” thoughts. I don’t know whether that would be the same for others but I suspect it may well be.

So, what about the supermarket? I need to dash (!) in there for some window cleaner. Everything is looking foggy so I think the windows must need cleaning. [Yes, I know, it’s corny but I just felt like being silly – on purpose, for a change!]

Actually, at the moment the Fibro Fog doesn’t seem particularly funny. Things have moved on from thinking one thing and saying another. This morning I was sorting out my medication and filling my weekly pill boxes. Things seemed to be going fairly well until I had filled the final box. I noticed that there was a half-full blister pack sticking out of a box. I had deliberately placed the pack that way after using it for the penultimate box as I knew I would be emptying it for the final box. However, once I had filled that box, I noticed that that pack was still half-full! I had put a different (and wrong) type of tablet in each day’s compartment of that box. I had no idea which type of medication I had wrongly used, although, luckily, I recognised which pill it was in each section and was able to remove it. It was a scary moment. Have I reached a point where I cannot be trusted to deal with my own medication? I really don’t want that to be the case… Really, really, really.

That mistake has given me a fright. However, I am not going to panic. I am going to allow myself to calm down and to mull things over. I need to recognise the best way to deal with this. I hope I manage to do so.

 

Transitioning

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Sydney, July 2013

FPR is very interested in words and is engendering a similar interest in my grandsons. He and I have discussions about new words and the way the language is changing, not necessarily for the better, in our respective opinions. I mention that because of the word I have used as the title of this post: Transitioning. I used the word deliberately because of one of the ways in which the word is used. When I talk about “transitioning”, I am not talking about transgender issues but, rather, about the transition I am undergoing at the moment because of the Fibromyalgia.

My Fibro symptoms have altered recently: some have become more pronounced, others have been making their debuts on my personal Fibro stage. These developments in the symptoms create a huge learning curve (sorry, FPR!) around how to live my life. I must admit to feeling fed up with some of the restrictions that my health is trying to force upon me. I don’t mind having to carry out tasks in small chunks – I am used to that and have found it to be a useful coping mechanism – but I really don’t like being penalised for having the temerity to go out for a few hours’ enjoyment and entertainment. That is just not on!

Over the past few weeks, I have had to pull out from several planned trips with friends because of the effects of fatigue. I am unbelievably lucky that my friends understand and tolerate these cancellations. I don’t like having to cancel but I am trying to be sensible and take care of myself. Actually, going out is one of the few areas of my life in which I am an optimist. I always assume that I shall be fine to go when the plans are made and, if fatigue is making itself felt in the period immediately prior to the trip, I believe that it will (miraculously) lift so that I’ll be OK to go. Of course, too often the fatigue doesn’t lift so then I put on my sensible head and don’t go. When I do go, I know that later in the day will most likely be payback time but that’s OK, I don’t think I complain much about that. However, the fatigue is altering. I sincerely hope that this change is a Fibro flare, rather than anything longer-lasting. After my last few excursions I have found that the after-effects have been lasting longer than a few hours. It now seems to be taking a good two days for them to wear off. Hmph. This is not acceptable. For goodness’ sake, Fibro, sort yourself out and stop knocking me out like this. Bossymamma is not happy. In fact, I am so not happy that I am likely to stamp my feet in annoyance (and FPR knows what I am like when I reach that stage, having witnessed it in Singapore!).

For the time being, I shall try not to overdo things and hope that friends are still happy to arrange trips out in the hope that, occasionally, they come to fruition, but I really do hope that  the fatigue slips back into our old routine.

As my friend, Anne, says, “Fibromyalgia: the gift that keeps on giving”.

 

Fs, Buts And Maybes

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Morocco (I think!), 2012

In the House of Commons, here in the UK, when the MPs have voted the result may well be that “the Ayes have it”. (‘Aye’ is pronounced ‘I’.) Well, unlike the House of Commons, in the house of Bossymamma it is the Fs that have it: Fibro Fog, Fibro Feet, Fumbling Fibro Fingers, Fatigue and Freezing [cold]. And I’m Fed up with it!

Let’s go through those and explain all the joys of the Fs.

Fibro Fog has been making itself felt over the past few weeks, in subtle ways rather than the full-blown muzzy headedness. I have found that simple things have been the ones that my brain hasn’t dealt with very well: for example, hearing “Monday”, repeating “Monday” but writing down “Wednesday”, or reading an instruction, apparently understanding that instruction, and then doing something completely different! One way in which the Fibro Fog has been particularly irritating is when I am knitting. Usually I can knit happily away making whatever takes my fancy. Hmph. Recently I have lost count of the number of times I have had to unpick my knitting because of silly mistakes that I would normally make only rarely. Very annoying.

Next we have the myriad delights of Fibro Feet. Oh, what would life be without Fibro Feet? For, literally, decades I have had hot feet. Admittedly, I don’t like having hot feet but that’s another matter. Now, however, I often have cold feet which, in itself, is not a problem: I simply put on a pair of socks. That’s fine until Fibro Feet decide to kick in [apologies for the unintended pun]. The internal temperature of my feet rockets, the knives start stabbing every part of my feet, the pain intensifies etc. etc. and I just don’t know what to do with my feet.

Now, Fumbling Fibro Fingers haven’t happened much up until now. The most notable occasion that they decided to play was when I was on at a hand sewing workshop – it was very inconvenient. So, Fumbling Fibro Fingers decided they were lonely and wanted to come for an extended visit. Gee, thanks, boys! Do you have any idea how frustrating it is when your fingers are following a different set of instructions from those your brain are giving them? Not only that, but they decide that not more than two fingers will work at any one time and when the next two join in, they will actually be following a third set of instructions that are in Japanese! I’ll just remind you of my love of knitting, here…

Fatigue. Need I say more?

Freezing? In September? In England? Surely not? Hmph. Surely, YES… I should say that this is possibly (or probably) nothing to do with fibromyalgia, but it’s happening now because I have been another sort of unwell and it’s adding to my fedupness.

I hope that my fedupness will soon be over and life will be more like my normal soon. I expect you are, too, so that my next post is not so grumpy.  Fumbling Fibro Fingers crossed!

 

 

A Few Days Have Passed

Aphrodisias, Turkey

Aphrodisias, Turkey

A few days have passed since my last post when I was talking about the Fibro Flare that I was having. Although the chest infection has pretty much cleared up, the Fibro Flare is still chugging along. However, it is not as acute as it was last week.

What I am finding is that I have very little energy. I don’t actually feel particularly lethargic when I am sitting down, but if I get up and try to do anything I become exhausted very quickly. For example, yesterday my son came to visit with some of his family. I saw his car arrive so went to greet them outside. It was just a matter of a few steps from where I was sitting and I was soon back indoors and seated again, but fatigue struck before I returned to my seat. Not only that, but the fatigue hit me in such a way that my brain was struggling to cope with them being around. I find it so upsetting when the Fibro stops me enjoying having my family around me. It’s no fun for them, or for me and it’s impossible to know when I will suffer that type of reaction. I don’t like it and I will NOT allow Fibro to stop me seeing my family and friends.