That’s Just The Way It Is

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Around St. Mary’s Cathedral, Sydney, July/August 2013

(Do you know, it takes me longer to find and decide upon the photograph for each post than to write the post?)

The weather has been very hot for the past couple of weeks and I am very fed up with it. Mind you, the people who are or have been closest to me would be amazed at how well I have coped with it. Believe me, hot weather and Bossymamma is not a good combination! I have always told people that my sons knew not to annoy me on a hot day because I was likely to explode at them. In fact, my Big Boy alluded to that, in a lighthearted way, when he and his family visited at the weekend. As for my Little Boy, he is probably dreading my impending visit!

I don’t know whether it is my advancing years, the Fibromyalgia, or a mixture of the two, but I seem to be coping with the heat far better than previously. I can’t begin to explain adequately how awful the heat usually makes me feel: it sucks every vestige of energy from me and makes me feel lousy. Actually, I don’t want to explain it, because of how dreadfully it affects me, so that is all I shall say about that.

To get back to the present, the heat seems to have triggered a major flare-up of the Fibro-related foot pain. It is particularly bad in my heels and often makes walking more difficult and more painful. The situation is made worse by the swelling in my feet, which I suffer in hot weather. I do take medication to reduce the swelling and I sit with my feet raised, whenever I can, but none of that helps enough. In fact, the pain has begun to manifest in my legs, in the three or four inches above my ankles. ‘Snot fair! Don’t like sore feet! Actually, the pain has been so intense, at times, that it has made me yelp. It used to be that the foot pain was at its worst soon after I retired to bed, but that is no longer the case. I think it is equally bad in or out of bed, at the moment. Sometimes it seems to be worse when I am in bed, but I don’t know if that is because there is less to distract me from it when I’m lying there. Whichever way you look at it, the foot pain is being very unpleasant at the moment.

Fatigue has also been problematic over the past couple of weeks. Obviously, it is impossible to know how much is attributable to the heat but, regardless of the cause, it has been challenging. Generally, when the fatigue is playing up, I can gauge when I have enough energy to deal with a task. However, that hasn’t been the case during this heatwave. When I have rested, I get up and start on the task I have set myself, only to find that my body can scarcely manage to move. There have been numerous times, recently, when my energy has simply evaporated. At those times, the lack of energy, the exhaustion, the fatigue, or whatever you want to call it, has been painful. I don’t mean that it causes pain but, rather, that it is the fatigue itself is painful. It has been difficult to cope with. I am used to my energy disappearing – I would say “disappearing in a puff of smoke” but there generally isn’t enough oomphf for it to manage doing that! – but the last couple of weeks have been a whole new ballgame. And, rather like the Football World Cup, I wish it wasn’t happening!

Amongst all this doom and gloom there is a metaphorical ray of sunshine: I have been granted a Blue Disabled Parking Badge! I can’t tell you how relieved I am. The whole application process caused me much anxiety. I knew that the state I am in should mean I am entitled to a Badge, but the process has been a challenge. I was so fearful of my application being rejected. My ability to go out and about has been severely limited because of the fatigue and the problems I have with walking, but I worried a lot about how well I would be able to put that across when making the application. It shouldn’t be like that and it makes me quite angry that disabled are put in that position.

When I was working, my job entailed completing all sorts of application forms for clients (I refuse to call people ‘service users’!). I had a very good success rate for Disability Living Allowance and Attendance Allowance claims as I knew how to put across the difficulties people had in a way that showed their entitlement. However, it’s a completely different matter when applying for something on one’s own behalf, as opposed to someone else’s. I suppose it’s because it is oneself who is affected by the results. When completing a form for someone else, it is very much easier to be objective than when applying for yourself. Even so, I think the ‘system’ makes things unnecessarily difficult for disabled people. During everyday life, people (whether able-bodied or disabled) look at ways that they can manage to do a particular thing but, when faced with something that requires proof of ability, or lack thereof, they have to ‘un’ think their solutions and focus on their difficulties. That is not easy. It may have taken years, with several increasingly complex ways of adapting their method to enable them to carry out that particular task. Not only is it difficult to think back and remember the difficulties you’ve had doing something, it’s also very depressing. You’re faced with the knowledge that there are lots of things you can’t do in the ‘normal’ way. Applying for any additional help is a gruelling task and one that it is not undertaken lightly.

Having clawed my way up onto my soapbox, I will now crawl down the least precarious route to tell you of one other thing that has happened since my last post.

Whilst sitting in the waiting room at the Amazing Dr. A’s surgery, prior to my appointment with him, I noticed a leaflet about something called the Staying Well Team. Upon reading said leaflet, I discovered that the team is there to help people with things to make their day-to-day lives easier or simpler. As my day-to-day life has changed so much recently, I decided I would give them a call. A lovely lady called Dawn explained that their main target age-group is the over 65s. However, in view of my difficulties, she said she would visit me to see if they could do anything to help. The visit went very well and she made several suggestions, most of which I thought were excellent. She is going to return with an Occupational Therapist with a view to my having a grab handle to help me cope with the step up to our side door, an extra bannister on the stairs and a folding seat in the shower. All of those will be wonderful as I am struggling in those three areas. She also offered me a toilet frame. hm. Not impressed. Really don’t want a toilet frame. Don’t like toilet frames. They make me think of people who are frail and about to ‘pop off’. They really are for Disabled People. And, yeuch, all those millions of corners which would fill up with nasty germy things – revolting! I am not at all houseproud, but toilet frames seem like really dirty, disgusting things. (Oh, crikey. What will I do if I reach the stage where I have to have one?) I was gratified that FPR was happy to have the equipment installed, as this house belongs to solely to him. I was also pleasantly surprised to hear that the equipment will not cost us anything.

Dawn also had questions and suggestions about social activities and said she will send me some information with my Well Being Plan. I emailed her after our meeting to ask about nail clipping services (as I don’t really want to pay £28.00 a time to a podiatrist to cut my nails!) and she has said she will include that information, too. Apparently the aim of the team is to delay the need for social care intervention. Whether that will be result  case remains to be seen but, so far, what the team provides is looking good. Watch this space!

 

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Back To Square One

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Faroe Islands, August 2016

It feels as though I have gone back in time – well, sort of.

Let me to take you back to 2014, before Fibromyalgia had appeared on my horizon. My mother had finally moved into the retirement complex that was her idea of Utopia. Leading up to the move, on the Monday evening she had graciously (hmm, my tongue was firmly in cheek for that particular statement!) granted me special dispensation to begin packing her clothing, shoes and possessions. This was a huge concession on her part as it meant she was going to have to live surrounded by boxes for, oh, three days. Sorry, do I sound bitter?

Come moving day, I organised the removal men whilst trying to finish the packing, clean the flat, deal with all those last minute things that crop up and answer the phone to her, seemingly every 10 minutes. And, it was a stinking hot day. I do not and have never coped well with hot weather. The following fortnight continued to be excessively hot, with wall-to-wall sunshine. I was getting up at 5 o’clock every morning so that I could try to clean the flat properly before the day became even hotter. During the day I would have to take my mother out so that she could buy lots of new stuff for her new home, then, come the evening, I would do more cleaning and unpacking. After two weeks of cleaning, unpacking, sorting and so on, I finished. Phew.

I went home and, within a couple of weeks, was hit by a chest infection. After several weeks of the myriad joys of a chest infection, and almost as many courses of antibiotics, I was still suffering chest pain. I also had pain in the thoracic region of my back, which I had not previously experienced with a chest infection. Not only that, but I was totally exhausted: I was sleeping for hours during the day, as well as through the night. After a month or so, the Amazing Dr. A diagnosed Fibromyalgia.

I spent most of September, October and November asleep. Not dozing in a chair, but asleep lying on the sofa. (I don’t like going to bed during the day unless I really have to.) And, now, I feel as though I am in a time warp as I seem to be sleeping an awful lot of the time. Groooaaaaannnnn. Actually, I probably haven’t been sleeping quite so much as in 2014, but the amount of sleep does seem to be increasing this week. I have been able to do less and less during the past few days.

Not very long ago, I was able to do quite a bit. Even on a bad day I would be knitting, sewing or on the internet during the time that my body needed to rest. Now, however, things have changed. I still knit, but can only do a few rows in any session. I can do a bit of hand sewing, but only for 20 or 30 minutes. But… I now spend quite a while doing nothing (apart, perhaps, from watching trashy television). It’s a sobering reality, how little I can do. I still hope that this level of fatigue is temporary, that this Fibro flare will calm down, but it’s becoming more difficult to believe it.

I am at a stage in life when I should be enjoying myself. I have few responsibilities or obligations and I don’t have to work. I should be seeing, doing and learning new and exciting things, going out with family and friends, living the life I dreamed of. I shouldn’t be falling asleep at the drop of a hat and struggling to make sense of simple things. ‘Snot fair! I don’t like it!

 

You Can Either Laugh Or Cry

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Bossymamma’s ugly feet!

The unpleasant photograph at the head of this post may give you a clue as to the subject of this week’s rant. Yes, I’m going to talk about Fibro Feet but, no, I’m not going to talk about the pain. Instead, I shall share with you the latest pleasure (?) that Fibromyalgia has shared with me.

Actually, and probably unsurprisingly, it isn’t a pleasure. Instead, it’s an absolute bl**dy nuisance! I’m really rather surprised by it and both of my sons will likely think that it is hilarious.

What is it, you ask…

Well, believe it or not, my feet have become very much more ticklish! Yes, I know, it sounds daft, doesn’t it? But it’s true!

My feet have always been ticklish – all my ##years. In fact, for most of my adult life I have been unfortunate enough to be able to tickle my own feet. You thought that wasn’t possible, didn’t you. Well, I’m here to tell you that it’s true: a person can tickle their own feet. Many times I have almost leapt off the bed whilst trying to put on tights because I’ve touched my foot in a certain way. It’s no joke, I can tell you.

And now, it’s even worse! I am really struggling to put on my shoes or slippers. As soon as my foot touches a part of the shoe or slipper, I almost jump out of my skin. As far as I can tell, I’m not doing anything different when putting on or taking off footwear but, my goodness, the reaction of my tootsies would make a liar of me. No more putting shoes on in a hurry and making a quick escape. Oh no! It’s more like one of the Ugly Sisters trying to fit into Cinderella’s glass slipper! Got time to spare? Just watch Bossymamma trying to put her shoes on!

* And in a note to my sons and grandchildren: keep away from my feet!!!

 

Downs and Ups

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Some Downs and Ups in Norway

You’ve doubtless heard the saying that what goes up must come down, but the opposite is also true: what goes down must come up. Well, that’s certainly the case when I fall!

Had I mentioned, previously, that falling is my latest hobby? It must be because it keeps happening, with disappointing regularity. I thought I had gotten away with it when FPR and I were in Devon at the beginning of this month, because I didn’t have a fall. I had fallen on our three previous holidays, so you can see why I half expected to take a trip on our latest trip.

It’s OK, no-one needs to worry, the long-awaited fall happened yesterday. Actually, I say no-one needs to worry but I was a little concerned because I wasn’t even walking when I went down. What happened was that my balance went and I dropped like a stone: flat on my back. It’s a funny thing, whenever I take a tumble, I don’t put my hands out to break my fall. That’s not a new thing. I remember a couple of falls which happened more than 15 years ago and, even then, I didn’t try to break my fall by putting out my hands. Hmmm. Weird.

Anyway, returning to yesterday’s gymnastics…

Luckily, FPR was with me and, even better, he didn’t immediately try to help me up. It is something that he and I have discussed: how, when someone falls, the automatic instinct of well-meaning people is to try to pick them up straight away. It is so kind of people to want to help but… please don’t rush to get someone up. For a start, when someone takes a tumble, they (I’m saying ‘they’ because I don’t want to muck about with her/him, s/he or any other description) need a few moments to gather themselves. I know that when I throw myself on the ground unexpectedly, it’s a bit of a surprise, or even a shock, and it winds me, both physically and metaphorically – and it takes a few moments to recover from that, apart from anything else. It also takes a bit of time to figure out what hurts and whether anything might be broken.

OK, so then we get to the interesting bit: getting oneself upright again.

This is not straightforward when one has a disability. One’s ability varies from day to day. Some days I can definitely manage far better than on other days. It means that I am likely to have to try different ways of getting up. Now, I have to say that FPR is very good when I am trying to right myself: he doesn’t try to get me up the way he thinks I should. Instead, he listens to what I say I need to try. I’m sure it must be very frustrating for him when I don’t try something that I have done on other occasions, but he takes it very well – for which I am grateful. Not only does he listen, but he does the things I ask, in the way I need.

Yesterday, a young woman rushed over to us and helped. She was very considerate, certainly helpful, and kind. She even offered to give me a lift home. It was lovely that she came over, also that she listened and acted on what was needed. What none of us realised was what would happen when I was almost upright: my balance went again and I narrowly avoided landing on the deck for a second time!

On our way home, I told that FPR that I shall have to ensure I have a walking stick with me when I go out. I don’t have a limp, it’s to help me keep my balance. I also said that, when I am getting up from a fall, I need him to hold my arm so that I don’t lose my balance again.

You know, the problems with my walking are disappointing and have brought all sorts of things to mind. However, I hope that I will manage to retain my sense of humour. After all, if I don’t laugh, I might end up crying – and I don’t really want to do that.

 

The Other Choice

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Morocco. February 2012

Last time I said about having a choice to make and went on to write about Fibro Feet. Well, today I am writing about the other option that was in my mind at that time: Tinnitus.

I have had Tinnitus since my early 20s. I clearly remember the first time I recognised that I could have different sounds in each ear, at the same time. It was in the village of Smarden, in Kent, just as I was about to get out of the car. (Just a useless piece of information for you.)

Tinnitus has a been a feature of day-to-day living for most of my adult life. Occasionally it would be severe but then it would settle down again: annoying and sometimes rather too intrusive, but not actually causing any problems. However, since the onset of the Fibromyalgia, the tinnitus has worsened considerably. I’m not saying that the worsening is solely due to the Fibro as some of my medication mentions that Tinnitus can be a side effect, but I certainly believe that Fibro has contributed to the worsening of the condition. I am finding that, more and more, Tinnitus is interfering with my actual ability to hear and distinguish sounds. For quite a long time I have sometimes had to struggle to tell whether a noise is in the environment or just inside my head, but now I find that there are occasions when the noise in my head is so loud and intrusive that it obscures environmental sounds to some extent. The obscuration can range from very slight to almost complete. I don’t think it is affecting my ability to hear speech as that seems to be pretty good but, if FPR asks me is I can hear a certain sound, I can struggle to hear it. It’s not nice! And I don’t like it!

I know that many people with Tinnitus suffer far more than I. I am grateful that mine is not considerably worse and I feel deeply for the suffering that those people constantly live with. My complaint is not so much that I have Tinnitus, it’s that the effects of it are another thing about Fibro that eats away at my self esteem. Bits of me are being stolen by Fibro and other conditions that I have: my brain no longer works as efficiently as I have been used to, my ability to cope with stress is practically non-existent, my body doesn’t function as well and, now, my hearing is being impinged upon. It feels like I am losing being me, that I am being taken over by another being (Fibro). I don’t know but perhaps I am afraid that I will be so completely subsumed by Fibro that I won’t be me, I’ll just be Fibro living in my body.

I think that, probably, most people take their bodies and brains for granted. I certainly did. However, when that edifice starts to crumble, it can be a struggle to find who one is in the rubble. I am still searching.

 

Which Way Shall I Go?

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My Big Sister

I am wondering which way to go, today. I’m spoilt for choice as I could go this way, or that. I am stuck between Scylla and Charibdis Charybdis (spelling mistake courtesy of FPR!). Caught between a rock and a hard place and trying to choose between the Devil and the deep blue sea. I’m weighing up all my options before I come down on one side or the other as, at the moment, I am sitting on the fence.

I need to make a decision.

Had you guessed that?

The decision concerns this blogpost but I shall continue as I am, for the moment.

When I go to bed I really like snuggling under the duvet. I especially like the winter because snuggling feels so cosy and warm, even though my nose is probably still cold. However, there is one problem with diving in bed and drawing the covers right up and around me: Fibro Feet.

Between about five to fifteen minutes after I settle in bed, my Fibro Feet switch on to maximum, which means that the covers have to be kept well away from my little tootsies. They are burning hot inside and it feels as though the skin is being scraped off with a rasp. In fact, that scraping feels so realistic that a picture of it happening comes into my mind. That, in itself, is unpleasant because, as those closest to me know, I am very squeamish. I really dislike blood and gore and the image that comes into my brain contains both of those.

Another sensation that begins is that of my feet being pinched by a strong metal clamp. It doesn’t feel as though they are being squashed, it has a very definite feel of being pinched. I wonder why it is that all the sensations and feelings connected with having Fibromyalgia and/or Chronic Fatigue Syndrome are all so unpleasant? The two conditions really should be told that it’s rather unkind to inflict all of that onto people who are having to cope with life encumbered by long-term illness.

The Fibro Feet don’t just attack when I am in bed, although they do consistently appear then. Their campaign against my poor plates of meat reignites at all sorts of times and in various places, but there doesn’t seem to be a regular pattern – except when I go to bed. It’s OK if I fall asleep immediately (feel free to snort with laughter at this point, if you wish), if not, they attack and they attack fast – and they ain’t takin’ any prisoners.

I’ve Had A Little Chat…

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The Library in Tromsø, Norway

This week I had a chat with the wonderful Dr A. I told him about the new symptoms that I am having and said that I was wondering I may have Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) as well as Fibromyalgia. He agreed that, in the light of the recurrent sore throat and swollen glands, it is likely that I have both conditions as they are often found in the same patient. We discussed the possibility of my taking medication but, as Pregabalin and Gabapentin are both primarily prescribed for pain, I said I would still rather hold them in reserve, for the time being. I know that I can change my mind at any time, which is reassuring. At the moment, I can cope with the pain and discomfort that I am having so it makes sense to hold those two big boys in reserve for when the pain starts firing on all cylinders.

I’m not sure how I feel about the dual diagnosis. On the one hand, I am disappointed to have CFS but, on the other hand, it isn’t a surprise, particularly in view of how troublesome the fatigue is being. Even with all the recent developments in my condition(s), I am still very fortunate. As I said above, I am coping with the pain whereas so many Fibro warriors are often floored by it. As usual, it’s the fatigue that pulls the rug out from under me. This week has been difficult as it seems that anything and everything that I do brings on the fatigue. It’s not just that I am weary and exhausted but that I feel so unwell with it. ‘Snot fair!

 

I Wasn’t Expecting That!

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Scandinavian Architecture in Norway (I think)

I had to see one of the GPs in our health practice, this week. Unusually, it wasn’t the wonderful Dr A but another of the doctors to whom he had referred me for a particular problem. In connection with that problem, she and I talked about fatigue and Fibromyalgia in general. As we were nearing the end of the consultation, I asked her about sore throats. I mentioned that several times recently I had had a very sore throat, although it hadn’t developed beyond the soreness. I said I wondered if it might be to do with the Fibromyalgia as, about 20 years ago, I regularly used to get a sore throat and lose my voice, sometimes for a month or more, due to stress. Dr B said she wasn’t aware of it being a symptom of Fibro but, as Fibro can be reactive to stress, it may well be connected. Nothing more was said about it.

Later in the week, I was reading this page, which I had linked through to from another page on that website.

Now, I don’t tend to read much about Fibromyalgia as, early in my Fibro journey, I found that the information I was reading was depressing me. I read about all sorts of symptoms that I didn’t have (at that stage, the only symptom I realised I had was fatigue – huge great bucketloads of it!) and they weren’t very nice! In fact, I’d go so far as to say that they looked a bit unfriendly, or even downright nasty! I made the decision there and then not to read about Fibro unless I began having a new symptom. If and when that happened, I could just do a quick check that it was, indeed, part of that joyful pakage otherwise known as Fibromyalgia, then not read any more. And that’s what I have done. Mind you, I hadn’t thought to look at whether a sore throat might be connected – that only occurred to me when I was talking with Dr B.

Oops, sorry, I went off at a bit of a tangent there.

As I said, I was reading that page later in the week and I saw that Sore Throat is listed as a symptom of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (otherwise known as CFS or ME).

Ting-a-ling.

I looked through the list of symptoms again and saw “adrenal stress (low stress tolerance)”.

Definitely ting-a-ling.

My ability to cope with stress has all but disappeared. It had been pretty ropey before the Fibro diagnosis, but now it is very notable by its absence. I may have misconstrued the phrase ‘adrenal stress’ but I have made a note for myself to speak to the wonderful Dr A about it. I’m not sure if being given a diagnosis of CFS/ME would make any difference but, somehow, I think it would feel tidier to know, one way or the other. There would be a place to cross-reference things in my brain’s internal filing system.

I hadn’t expected that I CFS/ME might be involved. I think I had avoided even thinking about any possible connection as it seemed a bit of a cliché and I didn’t, and still don’t, want to be a cliché. I already feel like a bit of one because I am an older woman who “suffers with her nerves” and I certainly don’t want to add to that feeling. However being able to say either “Yes, it is” or “No, it isn’t” would allow me to know where I stand… or, rather, where I collapse in a heap – very elegantly, of course! Ha ha ha.

A Very Special Gift

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Bondi Beach (I think!). Summer 2013

Here in the UK the National Health Service has a vaccination programme each winter to protect certain vulnerable people from flu. I can’t remember which groups are included – and I’m too lazy to check it, at the moment – but I know that I am one of the people invited to have the flu jab because I have a chronic chest condition. It usually takes me a while to get around to having the jab, but I do always make sure that I take advantage of its availability. I think it is sensible to have vaccinations when they are available. In fact, in 2015 I heard that there was a Shingles vaccine available.

Now, my body is extremely reactive to stress. Over the years, stress has caused me to suffer prolonged periods with no voice – the problem was so bad that I began learning sign language so that I could communicate with my family without having to write everything down. (Have you ever tried losing your temper when you have to express that anger down on paper? T’ain’t easy, I can tell you!) Stress has also caused me to suffer excruciatingly crippling headaches – not migraine but most definitely as bad as migraine – and also to develop Irritable Bowel Syndrome, amongst other things. Oh, yes… and Fibromyalgia.

Anyway, back to the Shingles Vaccine. When I learnt about it I was under a huge and prolonged period of stress. I knew, as did my favourite GP, that I was likely to be susceptible to anything and everything when the stress dissipated, so I asked him if I might be given the Shingles vaccine. He agreed that it would be a good idea but, unfortunately there was no way that it could administered within the NHS as I was outside the qualifying criteria. I decided to pay privately for the vaccine and, even though it cost more than £100, I remain certain that it was a sensible thing for me to do.

As you can see, I am a believer in the use of vaccines and so, this winter, I had the flu vaccine, as usual.

During the past three weeks I have been in the company of some people who have been suffering from the nasty cough/cold/flu lurgy that has been touring the UK. Usually, I would steer well clear of those nasty germies, but it wasn’t quite as easy as usual. Consequently, I have been half-expecting to be struck down with a severe case of Fibro Flu. Cue this week.

On Tuesday I began to feel unwell: very unwell. I had severe pain in the thoracic region of my back and also in my chest, both of which are pretty reliable signs of a chest infection working itself up into a frenzy. I was boiling hot. Then I was freezing cold. Fatigue and tiredness were off the scale. I felt decidedly l-o-u-s-y. My favourite GP likes me to keep antibiotics at home so that I can start taking them as soon as a chest infection starts because, once the infection takes hold, it is an absolute whatsit to get rid of. However, this time, I didn’t start taking the antibiotics. Although I seemed to have almost all of the symptoms, I wasn’t completely convinced that I actually had an infection. I already had an appointment booked with my favourite GP for Wednesday afternoon and decided that I would wait until I saw him and ask him to take a listen to my chest. Wednesday came and in I trotted to see my favourite GP. He checked me out and said that my chest was completely clear. It wasn’t a chest infection! Hmmm. Peculiar…

It turns out that my symptoms were all courtesy of “the gift that keeps on giving” (to quote my friend, Anne). My Fibromyalgia has decided  to make me feel so lousy that it feels like flu. Isn’t that fun? You’re right. It’s not.

Fave GP and I discussed Fibro, symptoms and medication and agreed on the same conclusion i.e. there is little point in me taking any of the recognised medications for Fibro as they are all aimed at the pain, which is the least of my problems. Fave GP asked me which symptoms I have and I went blank. I just couldn’t think! Whilst I was trying to reply, I had to pause for a while, after which I told him that dizziness (which had been the reason for the pause) is one of my symptoms. I told him that I have a wide variety of symptoms but little pain, compared to other suffers, for which I am very grateful. Please be sure, fellow Fibro sufferers, that I am truly thankful that the pain I have appears slight in comparison to what seems to be the case for very many people who have Fibromyalgia.

In view of the discussion of symptoms with Fave GP, I have decided to try and add a page to this blog where I can note any symptoms that I have. So, watch this space – or should I say, watch the space next to this space?

 

A New Realisation

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An eye-catching sculpture seen on one of our holidays

Today there was almost an enforced continuation of the dearth of writing on this blog. My frustration levels are quite high this morning. I have done quite a bit of IT and internet jobs for others over the past fortnight or so but this morning could have done with someone to sort out my own IT problems. Instead, I have cheated: rather than struggling to sort out the tantrum that our MacBook is in the middle of having, I decided not to log in as myself but, rather, to pretend I am a guest. Grooooaaaaaannnnn.

The need for this capitulation is irritating but I simply cannot face any more frustration at the moment. I have had several weary days during the last couple of weeks or so which have been frustrating but have also brought with them a new realisation. When I’m having a bad Fibro Day due to fatigue and lethargy, it affects my physical abilities. I don’t mean the direct physical effect of the fatigue making it exhausting to move but, rather, that I can also feel a difference in my abilities from a physical perspective. As you may have guessed by now, I am finding it difficult to describe what I mean. I think I shall explaining from a different direction.

The bad days I’ve been having have not exactly been Fibro Fatigue Days. They have been more generalised than that. I have felt achey, lacklustre, a bit foggy, weary, sort of “unpolished’, as though all of me needs spring cleaning. That description also includes how my body has felt. I have felt very stiff and my mobility has been poor. Even when I have felt brighter, it has been an illusion. My ability to walk any distance has been severely restricted. I went out with Little Sis earlier in the week and could barely put one foot in front of the other. It was as though each of my limbs and my body were being held back by some physical restriction. It wasn’t fatigue in my usual sense. It was more that I felt the Fibro was making me unwell and so stopping me moving.

I hope that explanation is clearer and easier to understand because I just cannot think of another way to describe it, apart from being frustrating. Sometimes I would be sitting and feeling fairly OK but, as soon as I moved, I looked and felt severely impaired. It was as though I had aged 20 years in 20 seconds.

Hey! Where did all those birthdays go? Where are my 20 years of presents?

What do you mean by “Just because you feel older, it doesn’t mean you are older”? Hmph!

OK, well, what about all the birthday cakes? *smiles hopefully